Kyrgyzstan: Parties Prepare for Parliamentary Elections

Kyrgyzstan will hold parliamentary elections on October 4 of this year. Currently more than 30 parties have already declared their eligibility for the elections and will compete for 120 seats in the Jogorku Kengesh, the Kyrgyz parliament and one of the most “dynamic” legislative bodies in the region. Elections in Kyrgyzstan have a relatively positive track record when compared to election practices in neighboring countries, although recently Kyrgyz democracy has been called into question by some in the West.

Due to conflicts in its relationship with the US and its accession to the Russia-led Eurasian Economic Union, some have begun to doubt the ability of the Kyrgyz government to hold truly fair elections. Kyrgyz President Almazbek Atambayev has drawn criticism for favoring laws deemed homophobic and xenophobic and has taken to promoting the theory that the US plans to overthrow the government in Bishkek. He has called for open and fair elections, however, and asked that future legislators, irrespective of their political party, emphasize rule of law and human rights.

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